Please translate in your native language

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

Hello Typophilers,

I’m working on a new website (and new typefaces) for the CakeType collection. I like to use recipes of a (chocolate) cakes as faketext. Can you help me by translating the following line into the language you speak?:

In a separate bowl whisk the egg yolks with the remaining sugar for one minute using the electric mixer.

I’m looking for Greek, Cyrillic and Latin based languages.

Thank you very much in advance!

Pieter

tishbite's picture

Bulgarian:)
В отделна купа разбъркай жълтъците с останалата захар за една минута използвайки електрически миксер

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

Thanks again my Typophile friends! :)

Pieter

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

Iceland somebody? :)

Pieter

Nick Shinn's picture

Jason, where is the best place for the circumflex on lower case "h" -- above the ascender or the hump?
(That's an Esperanto accent, isn't it?)

HaleyFiege's picture

I'm so blown away by all the different languages everyone here speaks. :)

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

Eskimo someone?
:)

Pieter

Linda Cunningham's picture

In Canada's eastern Arctic, it would be called Inuktitut. ;-)

I can't do it, but one of my favourite cooking show presenters could -- her show is done in Inuktitut, with English closed-captioning....

Jason Castle's picture

Nick--

Yes, that's an Esperanto accent. The circumflex for hcircumflex should be above the ascender. At least that's where I've always seen it, and that's where I always put it, although I'm not aware of any authoritative rule about its placement. I've thought about putting it lower (especially when the ascender is above the capheight), but that just causes other problems, like illegibility, for one.

--Jason

Nick Shinn's picture

Thanks Jason!

And then--centred above the ascender, or the whole letter width?
I would assume the ascender.

dezcom's picture

Nick,
The most current Adobe faces (see Arno) put the circumflex over the ascender. I assume they checked that out thoroughly with good sources.

ChrisL

Nick Shinn's picture

Chris, I generally follow Adobe practice, but good though they are they're not infallible, there is often more than one way to skin a cat, and it's brilliant to be able to discuss this here first hand with an Esperanto-reading type designer!

dezcom's picture

I certainly agree with that, Nick. I was just chiming in that Adobe agreed with Jason on placement so 2 bases were covered.

ChrisL

Nick Shinn's picture

In general, there's not enough room to put the h-circumflex accent over the hump, but in a small-x-height face, light and wide, there would be.

Jason Castle's picture

Nick--

I center the circumflex over the whole letter (h) and that seems to be the general practice in Esperanto literature -- although Arno Pro has it centered over the ascender. (The latter approach is more likely to cause spacing problems, I think.) As you said, Adobe is not infallible. The hcircumflex in Esperanto is the least used of the accented letters, and in fact there is a trend to substitute 'k' for it if that does not cause confusion with other words. Of course, that's beside the point; I think it's worthwhile to design our diacritics to follow common usage in the respective languages as best we can, but that's a whole other topic!

dezcom's picture

Hmmm, guess I'll have to shift some circumflexes back :-)

ChrisL

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